Obsidian Entertainment admits that they were pressured to release their games before they were ready

At long last everyone, we have a confirmation of our earlier statements (about publishers pressuring the development studios to release their games even when they’re not ready). In a Reddit IAMA discussion, Obsidian’s Engineer, Steve Weatherly, admitted that the company faced some external pressures – in the past – to release their games.
When asked whether Project Eternity would suffer from the very same issues that were present in all previous Obsidian games, Steve Weatherly said:
“I feel like we really helped turn our reputation around with Dungeon Siege 3. Myself and the other engineers spent a great deal of effort to ensure the underlying systems were rock solid so that designers had a good set of tools to build the game with. We’re applying those same principles to building the tech for Project Eternity. On top of that, thanks to you guys, we won’t have any external pressure to release the game before we feel it is ready.”
The key sentence here is the last one. As Steve admitted, there were external pressures to release their games before they felt they were ready. That also explains the massive technical issues that were present in games like Alpha Protocol and Neverwinter Nights 2, or the content that was cut from KOTOR 2 and Fallout: New Vegas.
Here is hoping that Project Eternity will be a polished role-playing game.
In other news, Project Eternity’s Kickstarter campaign has reached its second stretch goal and will feature Mac support.

John Papadopoulos

John is the founder and Editor in Chief at DSOGaming. He is a PC gaming fan and highly supports the modding and indie communities.Before creating DSOGaming, John worked on numerous gaming websites. While he is a die-hard PC gamer, his gaming roots can be found on consoles. John loved - and still does - the 16-bit consoles, and considers SNES to be one of the best consoles. Still, the PC platform won him over consoles. That was mainly due to 3DFX and its iconic dedicated 3D accelerator graphics card, Voodoo 2. John has also written a higher degree thesis on the "The Evolution of PC graphics cards." Contact: Email