Nvidia To Create High-Performance Visuals With Unreal Engine 4

Unreal Engine 4 v4
Epic Games announced that NVIDIA is now exclusively using its Unreal Engine 4 (UE4) game engine to create product presentations. The reveal of the company’s initiative came during the announcement of NVIDIA’s highly anticipated Project SHIELD portable gaming device at CES 2013, which featured a UE4-powered rendering of the SHIELD’s full-size, console-grade controller and Tegra 4 GPU.
NVIDIA heavily relied on the Unreal Matinee cinematic system to create the fly-through video which provided the world’s first glimpse of Project SHIELD and played during their CES keynote. This is the first time NVIDIA engineers have used a third-party game engine instead of their own internal engine for visual product demonstrations.
Tony Tamasi, senior vice president of content and technology at NVIDIA said:
“As a long-established Unreal Engine partner, we understand the sheer power that Unreal Engine 4 puts into developers’ hands. We immediately took the opportunity to utilize UE4’s high-end graphics features and incredible workflow to showcase how our graphics hardware is pushing the industry forward.”
Mark Rein, vice president and co-founder of Epic Games added:
“NVIDIA are always on the cutting edge, and we were thrilled to be a part of their awesome Project SHIELD introduction. The visuals their team are producing using Unreal Engine 4 in real time are fantastic, and they’re already exceeding some of the best pre-rendered visuals of only a few short years ago.”

John Papadopoulos

John is the founder and Editor in Chief at DSOGaming. He is a PC gaming fan and highly supports the modding and indie communities.Before creating DSOGaming, John worked on numerous gaming websites. While he is a die-hard PC gamer, his gaming roots can be found on consoles. John loved - and still does - the 16-bit consoles, and considers SNES to be one of the best consoles. Still, the PC platform won him over consoles. That was mainly due to 3DFX and its iconic dedicated 3D accelerator graphics card, Voodoo 2. John has also written a higher degree thesis on the "The Evolution of PC graphics cards." Contact: Email