Intel Arc feature

New details revealed for Intel’s AI-upscaling rival to NVIDIA’s DLSS

Videocardz has shared some new details about Intel’s upcoming AI-upscaling tech that will be a direct rival to NVIDIA’s DLSS tech. Intel’s upcoming GPUs will support this new tech and it will most likely be better than AMD’s FSR.

Intel has already stated that its upcoming super sampling tech will be artificial intelligence-driven. And, according to some leaked slides, this will be a “temporal-based upscaling technology that will account for motion vectors (velocity) and the history of previous frames“. In other words, it will be closer to what NVIDIA DLSS does and not as generic as AMD’s FSR.

As Videcardz stated:

“Intel XSS will be powered by DP4a and XMX instructions which are present in either already-released DG1 GPUs (Xe-LP) or the upcoming Intel Xe-HPG series (DG2). The XMX Matrix Engines are the building block of AI acceleration on next-generation Arc “Alchemist” GPUs. Each DG2 chip will feature 16 Matrix Engines and 16 Vector Engines.”

Intel claims that its Super Sampling tech will be significantly faster than native 4K. However, it will be slower than the traditional upscaling techniques (or rendering the game at 1080p).

Intel XeSS slide

Intel’s first high-end discrete GPUs will release in Q1 2022 and will support both Ray Tracing and DX12 Ultimate.

Intel Architecture Day 2021 Demo: Xe HPG – High Quality Super Sampling

John Papadopoulos

John is the founder and Editor in Chief at DSOGaming. He is a PC gaming fan and highly supports the modding and indie communities. Before creating DSOGaming, John worked on numerous gaming websites. While he is a die-hard PC gamer, his gaming roots can be found on consoles. John loved - and still does - the 16-bit consoles, and considers SNES to be one of the best consoles. Still, the PC platform won him over consoles. That was mainly due to 3DFX and its iconic dedicated 3D accelerator graphics card, Voodoo 2. John has also written a higher degree thesis on the "The Evolution of PC graphics cards." Contact: Email