AMD’s drivers are more stable than those from NVIDIA, third-party report claims

QA Consultants has released a report, claiming that AMD’s drivers are more stable than NVIDIA’s drivers. According to the report, AMD’s systems passed 401 out of 432 tests while Nvidia’s systems passed 356. This basically means that AMD’s GPUs achieved a pass rate of 93% whereas NVIDIA’s GPUs achieved a pass rate of 82%.

QA Consultants used six gaming machines and workstations from AMD and six from NVIDIA. The AMD GPUs that were used were Radeon RX Vega 64, RX 580, RX 560, Radeon Pro WX 9100, WX 7100 and WX 3100. On the other hand, QA Consultants used NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, GeForce GTX 1060 (6 GB), GeForce GTX 1050 (2 GB), Quadro P5000, Quadro P4000 and Quadro P600.

QA Consultants used the 64-bit variant of CRASH to stress the GPU. CRASH is described as a GPU stress test tool that spans 4 hours in length and captures test cases covering S3, display resolution changes, display orientation changes, content protection, and rendering. And as QA Consultants noted.

“While 4 hours of stress testing is a good indicator of prominent quality issues, it does not suffice in capturing intermittent stability failures or glitches. Therefore, we ran this test back-to-back around the clock for 12 days for each GPU. This accounts for 288 hours of non-stop stress in a test designed to make the GPU driver fail.”

So while NVIDIA’s drivers perform better in DX11 games and put less stress on the CPU, this test shows that AMD’s drivers are more stable!

John Papadopoulos

John is the founder and Editor in Chief at DSOGaming. He is a PC gaming fan and highly supports the modding and indie communities.Before creating DSOGaming, John worked on numerous gaming websites. While he is a die-hard PC gamer, his gaming roots can be found on consoles. John loved - and still does - the 16-bit consoles, and considers SNES to be one of the best consoles. Still, the PC platform won him over consoles. That was mainly due to 3DFX and its iconic dedicated 3D accelerator graphics card, Voodoo 2. John has also written a higher degree thesis on the "The Evolution of PC graphics cards." Contact: Email