Super Mario Maker 2 is already playable on the Nintendo Switch emulator, yuzu

The team behind one of the most promising Nintendo Switch emulators, yuzu, has released a new update that allows the emulator to play Super Mario Maker 2. Yeap, you read that right; the latest Mario game can boot, goes in-game and is mostly playable on yuzu.

As the team noted, it has been hard at work getting some important services and functions implemented in yuzu. Thanks to these new services and functions, Super Mario Maker 2 can now boot and is playable.

In case you weren’t aware of, Super Mario Maker 2 is a side-scrolling platform game and game creation system for Nintendo Switch that came out on June 28th.

Now contrary to Super Mario Odyssey, Super Mario Maker 2 does not feature complex visuals to emulate, something that obviously allows the current version of yuzu to run the game. Still, we believe that this is a huge milestone for the Nintendo Switch emulation scene, and something that fans of Super Mario Maker will appreciate.

Furthermore, and thanks to some of the changes and improvements that have been made to the emulator, this latest version of yuzu may also run faster other games. Some notably improvements are the implementation of Conditional Rendering, a Boost Mode, a new Shader Scanner as well as several GPU bug fixes.

Unfortunately, this version is available only to the yuzu patreons and there aren’t currently any plans of releasing it to the public.

Below you can find a video showing the July preview version of yuzu running Super Mario Maker 2!

John Papadopoulos

John is the founder and Editor in Chief at DSOGaming. He is a PC gaming fan and highly supports the modding and indie communities.Before creating DSOGaming, John worked on numerous gaming websites. While he is a die-hard PC gamer, his gaming roots can be found on consoles. John loved - and still does - the 16-bit consoles, and considers SNES to be one of the best consoles. Still, the PC platform won him over consoles. That was mainly due to 3DFX and its iconic dedicated 3D accelerator graphics card, Voodoo 2. John has also written a higher degree thesis on the "The Evolution of PC graphics cards." Contact: Email