Google announces a new game streaming service, called Stadia

At GDC 2019, Google announced its new game streaming service that will be called Stadia. Stadia is basically an evolution of Project Stream that Google launched last year. In other words, this isn’t a new console hardware. Instead, this is a streaming service and Google has released a trailer for Stadia that you can find below.

Google Stadia is designed to run on everything from PCs and Android phones to Google’s own Chromecast devices. It will support Android, iOS and Windows, however, it has not been confirmed yet whether console games will be also supported. Because otherwise, this is just “another” PC game streaming service and nothing mind-blowing.

Not only that, but assuming that both Xbox One and Playstation 4 games are supported which at this point seems unlikely, we also don’t know whether Google Stadia will allow PC players to game with their keyboard and mouse for these particular titles.

Google Stadia will support 4K/60 with HDR, and will allow players to stream up to 8K with 120fps. Yeap, Stadia will support 8K resolutions when those become widely available.

Stadia will be using Linux and Vulkan, and will take advantage of a new GPU from AMD, offering 10.7 of Terraflops. As such, Stadia will be capable of offering more raw power than both Xbox One X and PS4 Pro.

Google has also announced a new controller for Google Stadia!

Google will also have first-party games, though more details about these games will be revealed this Summer (since it will have first-party games I guess this won’t be a PC game streaming service. Instead, developers will have to port their games and develop them for Stadia alongside the Xbox One, PS4 and PC versions).

Google Stadia will release in 2019 on select countries!

John Papadopoulos

John is the founder and Editor in Chief at DSOGaming. He is a PC gaming fan and highly supports the modding and indie communities.Before creating DSOGaming, John worked on numerous gaming websites. While he is a die-hard PC gamer, his gaming roots can be found on consoles. John loved - and still does - the 16-bit consoles, and considers SNES to be one of the best consoles. Still, the PC platform won him over consoles. That was mainly due to 3DFX and its iconic dedicated 3D accelerator graphics card, Voodoo 2. John has also written a higher degree thesis on the "The Evolution of PC graphics cards." Contact: Email