Fallout New California patch 2.0.3 released, fixes hundreds of bugs and improves performance

The team behind the amazing Fallout New California mod for Fallout: New Vegas has released a brand new patch for it that fixes hundreds of bugs and improves performance, crashes, and many other bugs.

In case you weren’t aware of, Fallout: New California adds an all new story around a new player character, an adopted resident of Vault 18, embarking on a journey through the wastelands of the New California Republic’s Cajon Pass. This mod is described as an unofficial prequel to New Vegas that adds hours of new gameplay and a fully voiced stand alone campaign.

Going into slightly more details, patch 2.0.3 fixes hundreds of records, and features textures with a different form of compression and new mipmaps. This new compression improved overall performance, though the team is still looking into further improving things.

It’s also worth noting that the mod has been downloaded over 100K times. As the team stated:

“Diagnosing crashes, fixing bloated texture files, moving thousands of gigabytes of data around servers, fixing broken quests, adjusting narrative and objective text, fitting into a pre-existing community and tool user community, running tech & installation support — all with over 100,000 downloads over several platforms — that was an experience.”

Those interested can download this patch for Fallout New California from here. You can find the changelog for patch 2.0.3 here.

Have fun!

John Papadopoulos

John is the founder and Editor in Chief at DSOGaming. He is a PC gaming fan and highly supports the modding and indie communities.Before creating DSOGaming, John worked on numerous gaming websites. While he is a die-hard PC gamer, his gaming roots can be found on consoles. John loved - and still does - the 16-bit consoles, and considers SNES to be one of the best consoles. Still, the PC platform won him over consoles. That was mainly due to 3DFX and its iconic dedicated 3D accelerator graphics card, Voodoo 2. John has also written a higher degree thesis on the "The Evolution of PC graphics cards." Contact: Email