This 4GB Texture Pack for Fallout 4 adds 4K textures for its landscapes

Modder ‘Spiffyskytrooper’ has released a brand new version of his Natural Landscapes mod for Fallout 4. Natural Landscapes is described as a mod that aims to bring high quality, realistic 4K textures to the landscapes of Fallout 4.

As the modder noted, Natural Landscapes aims to stay true to vanilla where it can, and replace/expand upon textures where there’s room for improvement. This basically means that this texture pack stays true to the vanilla aesthetic while expanding where there isn’t much.

“For example, fallen leaf pile textures will be just that, fallen leaf piles, but the vague, brown mess that was the blasted forest floors is now dirt covered with forest debris like twigs, stones, and leaves. With this mod, I tried to make the textures not look too strong, or noisy. Nearly all of the textures in the ‘Landscapes/Ground’ folder have been replaced, with the exception of a few. The pre-war textures are unchanged, mainly because it’s such a small segment it would be hardly noticed. Trash debris is unchanged, also because it’s not largely used and wouldn’t be all that noticed either.”

Those interested can download this 4K texture pack from here (it also comes in a 2K version). All you have to do in order to install this mod is drag the contents of the mod into your Fallout 4 folder.

In order to showcase some of the new 4K textures, Spiffyskytrooper released some screenshots that you can find below.

Enjoy!

John Papadopoulos

John is the founder and Editor in Chief at DSOGaming. He is a PC gaming fan and highly supports the modding and indie communities.Before creating DSOGaming, John worked on numerous gaming websites. While he is a die-hard PC gamer, his gaming roots can be found on consoles. John loved - and still does - the 16-bit consoles, and considers SNES to be one of the best consoles. Still, the PC platform won him over consoles. That was mainly due to 3DFX and its iconic dedicated 3D accelerator graphics card, Voodoo 2. John has also written a higher degree thesis on the "The Evolution of PC graphics cards." Contact: Email