PUBG Corp. states “It’s time to FIX PUBG”

Fans of the sensation that plunged the global gaming community into a battle royale frenzy will be happy to know that several serious developments are on the way over the next three months. The South Korean developer, PUBG Corp., has recently revealed plans to implement several major updates to PUBG in order to address a growing number of concerns from their player base.

In a surprisingly humble quote stating “It’s time to FIX PUBG”, the developers launched a new website that aims to provide transparency on how gameplay will be adjusted by October. The site reveals that PUBG Corp. intends to focus on five broad areas that have pestered PUBG players in recent times, namely server performance, client performance (e.g. optimised frame rates), cheating, matchmaking and ‘quality of life’ (e.g. general bug fixing ).

The updates will, of course, be implemented for both the PC and Xbox One versions of the game.

Many commentators have speculated that PUBG Corp.’s renewed efforts to address problems with their smash hit have been prompted by an overwhelming amount of negative reviews on Steam. At the time of writing, the game stands at a 34% negative rating for the platform’s recent reviews (giving the game a ‘Mixed’ overall review).

As such, the website acts as a sort of live service to keep players up to date on which issues have been addressed, and to give a heads-up on what can be expected for future fixes and adjustments. Several Quality of Life issues have already been addressed in an update that was released on the 8th of August.

Despite the success of Fortnight, PUBG still has an extremely dedicated community and it is encouraging to see PUBG Corp. getting out of the courtrooms and back to making PUBG “a better, more stable, and fairer game.”

Check out the website for more info!

Pieter Naude

Pieter hails all the way from the tip of southern Africa and suffers from serious PC technophilia. Therapists say it is incurable. Now he has to remind himself constantly that gaming doesn’t count as a religion even if DRM is the devil. Thankfully, writing reviews sometimes helps with the worst symptoms.