Hilarious things happen when video-game physics go wrong

Fifa12
This article was inspired by a video that Elias Peppas shared with me. YouTube’s member ‘HelixSnake’ made a compilation of some epic physics fails from Skate 3. And this made us wonder; what could possibly go wrong in a video-game when its physics engine go insane? Well, the answer is quite simple. You can get some gay stuff thanks to the Impact Engine of Fifa 12 & 13, spinning cars, boobs that can go up and down, and games with non-existent collisions (yeah, we’re talking about the legendary ‘Big Rigs’ game).
In developers’ defense, we have to admit that physics can be really tricky. A simple pixel can be enough to cause havok and chaos. If you’re aware of the Chaos Theory, then you pretty much know what we’re talking about. One variable can be enough to bring the whole system down. Obviously, a solid physics engine needs to take into consideration each and every pixel of a game’s characters and objects. However, this is not happening due to system requirements, as it would take one hell of a CPU to handle proper collisions. And that’s precisely why you see collision issues in games like PES 2013, where a player’s foot can pass through a player’s body.
Naturally, below you can view some hilarious videos, screenshots and gifs (some that are courtesy of NeoGAF members). Feel free to share with us other games that had hilarious moments when their physics engine went wrong/insane.
Enjoy!

 

John Papadopoulos

John is the founder and Editor in Chief at DSOGaming. He is a PC gaming fan and highly supports the modding and indie communities.Before creating DSOGaming, John worked on numerous gaming websites. While he is a die-hard PC gamer, his gaming roots can be found on consoles. John loved - and still does - the 16-bit consoles, and considers SNES to be one of the best consoles. Still, the PC platform won him over consoles. That was mainly due to 3DFX and its iconic dedicated 3D accelerator graphics card, Voodoo 2. John has also written a higher degree thesis on the "The Evolution of PC graphics cards." Contact: Email