Allison Road, first-person horror game that was inspired by P.T, is back from the dead

Back in June, we informed you about the cancellation of Allison Road; a first-person horror game that heavily inspired by P.T. Well, it appears that this title is back from the dead as creator Christian Kesler confirmed that he has formed a new studio called Far From Home and that he’ll resume the work on it.

As Kesler told IGN:

“It did take a bit of soul searching to find the drive again to work on Allison Road and to simply make a call on what to do next. After the setback, I took a bit of a break from working on it and re-evaluated all the work that had been done so far—the whole journey, so to speak. I started making a few (in my opinion) necessary changes to the story and the flow, little bits and pieces here and there, and before I knew it, it sort of naturally came back to life.”

Kesler feels confident that he’ll be able to complete this project on his own. After all, Kesler was responsible for most of the stuff from Allison Road’s gameplay trailer.

“For our gameplay trailer, I did all the modeling, texturing, shaders, lighting, etc., and thankfully a lot of the mechanics are already implemented from the previous development phase, so I can comfortably take the game forward by myself. If and when it comes to a point where new features and mechanics are required, or old ones need changing, I’ll go look for support.”

There is no ETA, as of this moment, for when Allison Road will be released!

John Papadopoulos

John is the founder and Editor in Chief at DSOGaming. He is a PC gaming fan and highly supports the modding and indie communities. Before creating DSOGaming, John worked on numerous gaming websites. While he is a die-hard PC gamer, his gaming roots can be found on consoles. John loved - and still does - the 16-bit consoles, and considers SNES to be one of the best consoles. Still, the PC platform won him over consoles. That was mainly due to 3DFX and its iconic dedicated 3D accelerator graphics card, Voodoo 2. John has also written a higher degree thesis on the "The Evolution of PC graphics cards." Contact: Email